Tank

Team Yankee Tank Build

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While this is largely a WW2 Wargaming blog, the best of us get diverted and having been excited about the prospect of the Cold War in 15mm with a new ruleset and some great plastic kits I was delighted to see all the coverage for the Team Yankee range online over the launch weekend.

My pre-orders arrived just after and this Christmas break has been the first opportunity to build some of the kits.

I started with the T-72 as I’d recently had a chance to climb all over a real one. There is a basic build sheet in the box but a more detailed guide online. It went together very well and easily, starting with the tracks and hull, and then the turret. The main gun fits well, and the only fiddly bits were the smoke dischargers. Once built it looked great.

I then had a go at the M1. I can remember these thundering around central Germany in the 80s and this is a very nice kit. It includes options for later M1 Abrams models which implies Battlefront is perhaps looking ahead with is kit but I built the 80s version. Again it went together very well, everything snugly going together and no filler necessary. The size of the model even in 15mm shows what a monster piece of kit this was and still is!


I can’t wait to paint these as they are great models and I look forward to getting some M113s and BMPs next year.

Jagdpanzer IV Late War Tank Camouflage

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The German Panzer Museum in Munster has a staggering array of WW2 vehicles and visiting places like this helps to get a wider visual impression of the models we paint as well as offering inspiration to paint more realistic camouflage patterns. A quick scan of say painted 15mm WW2 German tanks on eBay shows a wide impression of what many believe camo on late war tanks looked like, but actual examples in museums can be very different to these models.

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This Jagdpanzer IV is a good example showing a common pattern of camouflage used. This was applied often by a tired tank crew and done with large, often dirty and grubby brushes, so there is room for interpretation: nothing was done to a template. The aim was to break up the uniform appearance of the tank and made it blend more with its surroundings, which is always worth bearing in mind when painting the models.

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The rear of the tank was often just in dunkelgelb as seen below.

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